Meet the Summer Editing Interns!

Meet the Summer Editing Interns!

 

LeeAnn Adams

Bellevue, NE

Where is your favorite place to read?

I like to be hidden in the shade of a mature oak or maple tree on a sunny day in the summer. Swaying in a hammock while I listen to the birds gossiping in the branches above me is preferable.

Imagine you are walking down the street and you spot a key on the ground. What does it look like? Do you pick it up? Why or why not?

I nearly step on the key before I notice it. Out of curiosity, I bend down to pick it up off of the cracked cement sidewalk. It sits in the palm of my hand like a misshapen quarter. The key is new, silver-colored. There is a small strip of masking tape wrapped around the bow of the key. In tiny, purple letters, a name is scrawled on the tape. The name reads “Benny.”

I realize this probably belongs to a kid who’s been entrusted with a house key for the first time. When I was a child, I’d lose my house key more often than I’d like to admit. I had a terrible memory and was easily distracted.

I decide to return the key to Benny so that he no longer has to worry—and his parents no longer have to worry—about where it is.

There’s only one problem—I don’t know where Benny lives. The only option is to try the key in the locks of some of the nearby houses. That’s when I notice the blade, on the tips of the teeth, are stained red.

I look up to find a young boy has approached me. He has blonde hair, the bangs swept to the side, and eyes that are watching my every movement. He holds out his hand.

“That’s mine,” he says.

“What’s your name?” I ask.

“None of your business.” The palm of his outstretched hand faces the sky. He waggles his fingers. “I’m not supposed to talk to strangers.”

“I’ll give you the key if you can guess what’s written on the tape,” I say.

He squints his eyes in a way that suggests exasperation. “Benny. Now can I have it?” He uses his other hand to pull an unwrapped, cherry AirHead from his pocket.

I hand over the key, both disappointed and relieved.

How do you take your coffee? If you don’t drink coffee, describe a beverage ritual in which you take part.

I take my coffee spontaneously. Sometimes it’s a vanilla flat white, other times a mocha, often a homebrewed concoction of Fair Trade coffee and a generous helping of cream. Medium blends are my favorite, but I’ve had everything from breakfast blends to espresso roasts. The maximum amount of coffee I can consume before I get the jitters is three mugs in a single sitting. However, the minimum required dose is one cup daily.

What is your favorite English word and why? Do you have a favorite word in another language?

It’s hard to pick a favorite English word—especially since so many of the words have roots in other languages. Here are some of the words I am enjoying at the moment: ruminate, grasp, presupposition, ablution, terminate, viscosity, dystopia, paradox, preliminary, pit, blueberry, toads, frost, cannibalism, chipper, torque, blunder, blabber, troubadour, spawn, tickle, tender, radius, blast, bumblebee, Tesla, shipment. I like the sound of words, how they roll around on your tongue and pop from your lips.

Words that are not from the English language that I currently enjoy are arigato (ありがとう) and décollage.

You’re on a desert island. You have one album. What is it and why?
I’d have the Boston album. I grew up listening to Boston as a kid, because my dad played it all the time. We listened to it in the house, on road trips, in the garage—anywhere and everywhere Dad could play a cassette tape. Recently, I went to a Boston concert with my Dad and it was downright, face-meltingly amazing. Besides, there’s nothing like listening to “Peace of Mind” when you’re alone on the beach, soaking up some sunrays.

Taylor Atkinson

Lakewood, CO

Where is your favorite place to read?

My favorite place to read right now is on a couch on the 3rd floor of the Tivoli Student Union. It has great natural light with all of the benefits of people watching when I look up, all accompanied by the white-noise hum of busy students.

Imagine you are walking down the street and you spot a key on the ground. What does it look like? Do you pick it up? Why or why not?

I’m walking down the street and find a key on the ground. If it is a skeleton key, I pick it up and give it to my girlfriend for her craft supply collection. If it is an important looking key (DO NOT DUPLICATE), I turn it in to the nearest lost-and-found.

How do you take your coffee? If you don’t drink coffee, describe a beverage ritual in which you take part.

One of my beverage rituals is freezing eggnog. This wondrous drink is only available during the holiday season. At the beginning of each year, I buy 3-4 quart-sized cartons and freeze them in order to thaw and drink throughout the year.

What is your favorite English word and why? Do you have a favorite word in another language?

My favorite English word is “liminal.” It’s great to be two places and yet no where determinate at once. My favorite non-English word is “Natchitoches” because, unless you’ve been there, you’ve little chance of pronouncing it correctly.

You’re on a desert island. You have one album. What is it and why?

I am on a desert island. I have only one album. It is it the John Williams compilation of themes from Spielberg film scores. Williams is one of the best contemporary composers and has been  inspirational.

Alex Buis

Denver, CO

Where is your favorite place to read?

My favorite place to read is the cocooned recumbency of my hammock strung between high limbs of trees in Wash Park or the rocking chair on my front porch in Tennessee overlooking the horses, ponds, and family.

Imagine you are walking down the street and you spot a key on the ground. What does it look like? Do you pick it up? Why or why not?

The key would be stubby and only have one tooth, like an 8 year old with a snaggle tooth, not disproportionate to the key’s shape, but sort of funny and awkward. It would lead to the guitar case that I lost containing the guitar whose fate was equivalent. I would keep it as a memento, clue, and weapon.

How do you take your coffee? If you don’t drink coffee, describe a beverage ritual in which you take part.

I do my coffee with a scoop of sugar that’s shaken so any additional mountain piling is levelled off at the rim level of the spoon. Next I froth heavy whipping cream and stir that in, but not so much that it all dissolves into the coffee, I like to see the froth to prove that I frothed in the first place. My friend uses butter, but the those limpid oil lily pads creep me out and remind me of gasoline. Finally, if I’m near the Amish Hippie on top of Monteagle, I snag some of their spice blend and stir that in as well.

What is your favorite English word and why? Do you have a favorite word in another language?

“Hottentottententententoonstelling” is my favorite word in Dutch. It’s folklorical, passed down as a childhood anecdote like the Tooth Fairy as the longest word in the world, making the Dutch language the superior tongue and its people indubitably the greatest. It is said to mean tents, or a tent exposition. I was deceived until a few years ago by my dad that this was a real word. I taught it to my second and third grade class when we practiced spelling. My dad won that round. I like the word “fuzz” a lot and “rambunctious” and “cantankerous” and “miasma.”

You’re on a desert island. You have one album. What is it and why?

If we’re talking music, holy hell on earth that is a difficult decision. I want Deer Tick’s War Elephant but that’s too tragic if it’s the only sound available; Blonde on Blonde, but I may go eternally haywire (would I realize it, maybe not, and even so, I might not care, but what if I got off the island?…); Goodbye Bread is immaculate but it would bother me after a while; Hard Knox by Wand makes me feel all sorts of things but it’s also intractable and obscure.

I would wind it back to an album that truly speaks to me as a person now, before, and prenatal: The Dire Straits’ self-titled debut record. “Sultans of Swing” brings two of the greatest guitar solos of all time to the turntable, “Down to the Waterline” is so fluid and western, “Six Blade Knife” is seductive and edgy, then “Lions” and “Wild West End” are both plaintive, yet firm and groovy.    

Ray Diess

Denver, CO

Where is your favorite place to read?

As far away from distractions as I can get.

Imagine you are walking down the street and you spot a key on the ground. What does it look like? Do you pick it up? Why or why not?

It’s 2010 and I’m a sulky 14-year-old d-bag. I step on an organ key in the middle of the woods and I hear a badly-produced low humming noise, like the Inception soundtrack. Jesus comes down. He says, “Hey kid, you just threw the whole world out of tune.” I say, “Oh no! What do I do?!?” He tells me to figure it out and that, no, he doesn’t want to hang out. He leaves. Six years later climate change is most definitely a thing, the EU is in trouble, Trump and Clinton are running and all I can do is sweat bullets all over my computer keyboard as I confess to all of this.

How do you take your coffee? If you don’t drink coffee, describe a beverage ritual in which you take part.

Off-tan and kosher, just like me.

What is your favorite English word and why? Do you have a favorite word in another language?

Contransmagnificandjewbangtantiality. Cheeky Joyce knew how to be blasphemous without anyone catching on.

You’re on a desert island. You have one album. What is it and why?

It’s 2016 and I’m a sulky 20-year-old d-bag stranded on a desert island. I’m freaking out. Jesus comes down. He slaps me hard and hands me a copy of Hot Rats by Frank Zappa. I cradle the album and look up through my bangs into his big brown doe eyes. He nods, then I nod; I know what to do. I run off to put the world back in key.

Rachel Greenberg

San Diego, CA

Where is your favorite place to read?

In coffee shops or at home on the couch.

Imagine you are walking down the street and you spot a key on the ground. What does it look like? Do you pick it up? Why or why not?

It’s a key for the laundry room in my apartment building, it’s a square, compact, utilitarian key. I do pick it up. I intend to give it to the apartment manager. I never remember to do it. I keep it on the table by the door for a year. I throw it away when I move.

How do you take your coffee? If you don’t drink coffee, describe a beverage ritual in which you take part.

Plain espresso, at least two shots, nothing extra in it. With seltzer on the side if I’m somewhere fancy!

What is your favorite English word and why? Do you have a favorite word in another language?

I really like the word “heavy.” Definitely over-use it in my writing. But it just has so much oomph when you say it. The little sigh at the beginning just sounds like you’re picking something up or like something has just overwhelmed you and I love onomatopoeia in my words.

You are on a desert island. You have one album. What is it and why?

Skinny Puppy, Too Dark Park. It’s a complicated album and I find something new in it everytime I listen. But it’s also danceable.

Chris NotarnicolaChris Notarnicola

Pompano Beach, FL

Where is your favorite place to read?

There is nowhere I like to read more than my own home. I have a 900sqft apartment, give or take, which I have furnished and decorated around the facilitation of two activities: writing and reading. My living space is my reading nook. Ask me to spin the web cam around if you’re interested in my bookshelves. They’re upcycled. I’m quite proud of them.

Imagine you are walking down the street and you spot a key on the ground. What does it look like? Do you pick it up? Why or why not?

Reaction: It’s an antique, a skeleton key from some European style cottage, rusted, but charmingly so.  I pick it up because I know my girlfriend, Daniele, will want to add it to her Steampunk costume.

Reconsideration:  It’s a new, brass, machine cut copy of a key that looks just like one of mine. I pick it up, put it in the change jar on my kitchen counter, and relish in the idea that I might have access to one of the other apartments in my building.

How do you take your coffee? If you don’t drink coffee, describe a beverage ritual in which you take part.

By default, I take my coffee with cream and sugar. I will, however, drink it any way so long as it enters my heart, flows into my fingers and bleeds over my desktop. I don’t mind the cleanup.

What is your favorite English word and why? Do you have a favorite word in another language?

“Sesquipedalian” is a pretty great word, but I never use it. Perhaps I should be more playful and claim that my favorite word is “why” and justify it by asking—why not?  In another language, Italian, I like the phrase “In bocca al lupo,” which literally translates to “in the mouth of the wolf.”  It’s the equivalent of “good luck” or “break a leg.”  The response, though, is my favorite.  “Crepi!” In this context, the word translates to “may the wolf die,” and is the equivalent of thanks.

You are on a desert island. You have one album. What is it and why?

Oh, shit. This is brutal. I love how this same question is addressed in the film Green Room written and directed by Jeremy Saulnier. I don’t want to spoil, as it’s a recent film, but I will recommend it.  If you’ve seen Green Room, the film’s answer is my answer. If not, Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness by The Smashing Pumpkins.